Author Archives: lindam55

March SOTM – Remote

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I am sorry I mssed stitching with the group today. Everyone’s pieces look fabulous.

I also “unstitched” several times before finally declaring it done. Here’s my progress. I may try to improve my French knots once some more of the design is revealed.

Linda's SOTM

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2019 Woodlawn Drop-off

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Mr. M and I packed up the little Mazda 3 and set off on Friday. It’s actually quite remarkable how much can get stuffed into that car – we didn’t have an inch to spare!

Yes, we did manage to fit in some luggage.  And Mr. M didn’t have to travel with anything on his lap!

Our first stop was Starbucks in Mt. Laurel where we met Melita, who is also submitting a piece to Woodlawn so we added that to the inventory. Melita designs some fabulous pieces and blogs about her various projects at Melita Stitches 4 Fun. Be sure to check it out.

The rain eventually stopped as we were traveling through Maryland. We stopped for lunch at BJ’s Restaurant and Brewhouse in Laurel. I do have a deal with Mr. M – whenever possible we try out a brew pub for lunch on a stitching field trip. BJ’s is a chain that we’ve been to in the past so we knew what to expect. But the food is good (I had a bowl of excellent vegetarian lentil soup that was quite filling) and Mr. M enjoyed the beer.

After lunch we headed to The Waste Knot in Arlington to see the new shop. Last year Lori moved a few blocks from her Lee Highway location to a larger and much brighter shop on Glebe Road. She carries quite a lot of threads and beads along with all the canvases. I did purchase one canvas as well as needles and a couple of small magnets. I had to buy those because I had brought two projects to work on in the evening but forgot needles and magnets.  What a disaster that could have been!

The Waste Knot’s new location

Ho Ho Ho 021219

Ho Ho Ho from Strictly Christmas

We stayed at the Embassy Suites in Old Town Alexandria, right near the King Street Metro Station. We did make quite a sight as we unpacked a few pieces of luggage and then started carrying in all the needlework pieces.

On Saturday our appointment at Woodlawn was 10:00. In years past we’ve had a 9:00 appointment, in advance of the general public (well, the general stitching public) bringing their pieces in. This year was different – and was probably the most efficient one yet. We were met by Debra K. who is one of the co-chairs of the show and a member of Nelly’s Needlers. Instead of checking in at the front desk, we were led to the other wing for a separate check-in. For those who have been to the Exhibit, we were in the room that houses the Cafe.

They had several tables set up for us; Mr. M and I unpacked all of the pieces and lined them up. Only after all the pieces were unpacked (which itself took about 30 minutes) did Debra start the check-in. She processed the paperwork and examined every piece so that she could note the condition of each, including slight marks on frames, buckling of canvas, etc. Debra was very thorough in her examination and we talked quite a bit about finishing techniques. As we were entering the pieces many of the other volunteers came through and looked at our submittals. As was expected, there were a lot of comments about all the different colorways for Stars for a New Millennium; several people were trying to decide which colorway was their favorite. By the way, we have 9 versions of Stars in the Exhibit.

While we were checking in we did chat with some of the other volunteers. We learned that almost half of the pieces that had been entered were from first-time exhibitors, and there is a notable increase in the number of men who entered this year. I think that’s a great sign for the continuation of our craft!

All in all, the check-in process took 2 hours to get our 27 pieces (by 19 NJNA exhibitors) fully checked in. By that time we felt we deserved a nice lunch, so we headed back to Old Town to The Wharf on King Street where Mr. M enjoyed a shrimp po’boy and I had a lovely she-crab soup and side salad.

We had an early dinner reservation at the Mt. Vernon Inn that evening so we returned to the hotel and sat in the atrium where the lighting was perfect for me to stitch. I managed to get quite a bit of Herringbone Happening stitched.

Dinner was fabulous and I enjoyed a brie appetizer, a large salad with shrimp, and a slice of cherry pie. Mr. M had the turkey pot pie and apple pie. We also were very pleased with a Virginia wine. This was the first time we had been to this restaurant, although we had visited the estate in years past, but it won’t be our last time.

We traveled home on Sunday and made good time – at least we arrived back in NJ early enough to get settled before facing the work week.

We’ll be heading to the Exhibit in early March when Nora is home for Spring Recess. I’m looking forward to seeing all of our pieces! I hope you’ll consider heading to Woodlawn to see the exhibit. It is open the entire month of March (except Tuesdays). There are quite a few events in conjunction with the Exhibit, so be sure to check them here.

Happy Stitching!

Linda

2018 SOTM – Wrap-Up

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This is a bit late but I didn’t want to miss the opportunity to share everyone’s progress on our 2018 projects.  Many of the group worked on Lorene Salt’s Autumn Kaleidoscope this year while others continued to work on SOTM projects from previous years.  A few of us finished while others have a little more stitching to do.  We all had a great time at our monthly sessions and will be sharing our 2019 projects.

Barbara finished and framed her Stars for a New Millennium (Tony Minieri Designs) in time for the Woodlawn Needlework Show.

stars finished - barbara

And the roll call of Autumn Kaleidoscope; note that in addition to changing the colors many of our stitchers also varied the borders.

january 2019 - amy

Amy

 

january 2019 - diane

Diane

january 2019 - janet

Janet

january 2019 - janice

Janice

january 2019 - jill

Jill

january 2019 - linda

Linda

january 2019 - mally

Mally

january 2019 - marge

Marge

january 2019 - nancy

Nancy

january 2019 - noelle

Noelle

january 2019 - robin

Robin

january 2019 - rosie

Rosie

january 2019 - sue c

Sue C

january 2019 - sylvia

Sylvia

What a great project!  Thank you, Lorene!

 

SOTM – December

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I know I’m very late in getting this posted, but it’s a busy time of year!

The December SOTM gathering is especially fun as we not only stitch but also enjoy a pot-luck lunch. This year was no exception as we worked our way through a reuben casserole, several different salads, deviled eggs, and delicious desserts. The food was fabulous and the friendships are priceless!

Many of us are finishing with Autumn Kaleidoscope (designed by Lorene Salt), which was the SOTM this year.  By the time you see this, a few will have completely finished.  Those of our group who chose their own colorways were deciding on bead colors and will be making a trip or two to find the perfect beads!  And I apologize – but something seems to have gone wrong with my photos of this month’s progress.  So, no photos this month.  But we’ll try to get them back in January for a full display!  In the meantime, check out the NJNA December Meeting Summary for some of the completed pieces.

The SOTM project for 2019 will be the ANG Mystery Project.  We are looking forward to seeing this project develop!

Until January – happy holidays, happy New Year, and happy stitching!

 

 

SOTM – November 2018

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Twelve of the SOTM group met today to stitch and share conversation. It was a bright autumnal day and our stitching area was well lit. We even had a surprise visitor – Tina was able to join us to stitch today as she has been visiting from Wisconsin! It was great to catch up with her.

Here is our progress as of this month. All of the projects look fabulous!

November - Barbara

Barbara’s Stars for the New Millennium

Autumn Kaleidoscope progress.

November - Ellen

Ellen

November - Jill

Jill

November - Joan

Joan

November - Linda

Linda

November - Nancy

Nancy

November - Noelle

Noelle

November - Rosie

Rosie

November - Sue C

Sue C

November - Sylvia

Sylvia

November - Tina

Tina

And, no, you didn’t count wrong – Margaret is being shy about her progress on Stars but we’ll get a picture soon.

Next month those of us stitching Autumn Kaleidoscope will be working on the outside border and the beading. And, we’ll all be deciding on our project for next year!

Happy Stitching!

 

Winterthur Conference – Day 2

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I am back in New Jersey to write this as I was just too tired on Saturday night. And yesterday Mr. M and I got to drive to Long Island so that we could have dinner with my father and sister to celebrate their birthdays (95 for him, 61 for her). Can someone explain to me how it take 2-1/4 hours to drive 125 miles from Winterthur, DE (even with some construction detours) and almost 3 hours to drive the 65 miles to Jericho, NY?  Gotta love the NY/NJ Metro area!

Saturday morning I got to pack up and head over to Winterthur for a free morning just wandering around the grounds and the Galleries. I was not sure of my timing so I didn’t wander too far, but I did get to see a few of the follies on the property (a folly being a costly ornamental building with no practical purpose). Maybe if I win the lottery I can build my own folly!

Autumn Garden

The Galleries provide an up-close and personal look at objects in the museum’s collection, and the pieces are changed periodically.  There are several galleries but I stayed focused on the Textiles and Needlework.  (You can access the collections online.)

There was a special exhibit entitled Dining by Design: Nature Displayed on the Dinner Table which included some very elaborate table pieces.

And, of course, there was the exhibit for the conference Embroidery: The Thread of History.

One of the most impressive pieces in the exhibit is an embroidered casket and toys created by Janet Carija Brandt from Indianapolis. It is part of a group of work she created imagining the adult lives of traditional fairy tale characters. The piece on exhibit shows the life of Little Red Riding Hood. My pictures do not do this piece justice so please click on the link here; it is amazing!  Be sure to explore her site to see the toys that go with the casket as well as all of her amazing work.

Of course the afternoon was spent in more fascinating lectures. Did you know that the National Archives and Records Administration in DC found six embroidered samplers in the tens of thousands of documents housed in the Archives? In Embroidered Evidence: Family Record Samplers in the Revolutionary War Pension Files of the National Archives, Washington, DC, Kathleen Staples described how these samplers were used as legal proof in determining the eligibility of claimants for Revolutionary War pensions!

In Embroidered Narratives: Storytelling Through the Eye of the Needle, Susan Boardman, an artist from Nantucket, described how she was inspired to create 8-inch by 9-inch textile narratives of women who lived on the island during the ninetheenth century. Her creations use dye painting, hand embroidery, handmade needle lace, appliqué, beadwork, gold leaf, carving and quilting.

In Collecting for Love or Money: A Discussion of Needlework Donations to The Met and the Art Institute of Chicago, Melinda Watt, Chair and Christa C. Mayer Thurman Curator of Textiles, Art Institute of Chicago, described the individuals who amassed diverse collections of European embroideries.

Our final speaker was Dr. Susan Kay-Williams, Chief Executive of the Royal School of Needlework, Hampton Court Palace, UK, who spoke on Fine and Beautiful: Historic Commissions from the RSN Studio. Dr. Kay-Williams was fascinating as she described some of the history of the RSN; it moved seven times in the 146 years since it was first established, settling in its current location in 1987. RSN tutors work in teams on a project and the training is such that no matter how many people are on the team the final piece looks as if it was completed by one person. One incredible project that they worked on was The Overlord Embroidery which tells the story of the D-Day Invasion and the Battle of Normandy in 34 embroidered panels, a total length of 83 meters (about 272 feet).

This conference was truly amazing and I’m so glad I was able to attend. The next conference will be in 2020 (date TBD) and will focus on the work of Erica Wilson, so it promises to be another exciting event.

For fans of The Crown, Winterthur will be mounting an exhibit in March 2019 entitled Dressing the Crown which will feature the fashions from the series.

Finally, for those of you who are readers of history, Dr. Joan DeJean, who I mentioned in my previous post, has written a book entitled The Queen’s Embroiderer: A True Story of Paris, Lovers, Swindlers, and the First Stock Market Crisis. I have my copy already and am looking forward to reading it.